Midwest Nephrology Consultants Patient Resources
home
contact_us
specialty_care
kidney_failure
dialysis_centers
links
Q&A
payment
patient
Laboratory Services
Privacy Policy
Careers
 
Whats New

Diabetes

The term diabetes, without qualification, usually refers to diabetes mellitus, which is associated with excessive sweet urine (known as "glycosuria") but there are several rarer conditions also named diabetes. The most common of these is diabetes insipidus in which the urine is not sweet (insipidus meaning "without taste" in Latin); it can be caused either by kidney (nephrogenic DI) or pituitary gland (central DI) damage. It is a noninfectious disease. Among the body systems affected are the nerve, digestive, circulatory, endocrine and urinary systems.

The term "type 1 diabetes" has universally replaced several former terms, including childhood-onset diabetes, juvenile diabetes, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Likewise, the term "type 2 diabetes" has replaced several former terms, including adult-onset diabetes, obesity-related diabetes, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Beyond these two types, there is no agreed-upon standard nomenclature. Various sources have defined "type 3 diabetes" as, among others, gestational diabetes, insulin-resistant type 1 diabetes (or "double diabetes"), type 2 diabetes which has progressed to require injected insulin, and latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (or LADA or "type 1.5" diabetes.)